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1

Call number: Act No. 2826 
Source (S812408017)
 
2
 
Malinowski, Zygmunt (I2)
 
3

PavlovicHistory
astold by Emily McIntire


I have heard the story how my parents came from a far away country across a huge ocean to the United States. In my childhood fantasy I use to wonder whose little girl I would be if my parents had stayed in Europe. Little did I realize at the time that being their child was the most fortunate thing that could have happened to me. Surely, no one had better, more loving, more caring parents than I and my sisters and brother had.

When we happened to occasionally talk about people coming here, I am often asked why my parents came. The Slovaks were one of many ethnic peoples who had been ruled by the Magyars or Hungarians for centuries. Now the aim of the Hungarians was to completely Hungarianize or even eliminate allethnic groups under their rule. They wanted one nation and one culture. In the middle 1800’s they began an intensive campaign to accomplish this. They used various ways, all state and administration and education had to be in Hungarian. All legal documents had to be written in Hungarian. All other languages were not to be used. Hungarian exclusively had to be used in the schools. Any Slovak schools of higher learning were closed. There were also petty restrictions. To vote, the ordinary Slovak had to have an income of at least 400 crowns annually. He had to be fluent in Hungarian. There was to be no gathering together of Slovaks. No signing ones name on the back of photographs. I don’t quite understand what that was about. No welcoming back a released prisoner who had been jailed because of non-Hungarian convictions and this restriction, which made me very sad when I read about it—no Slovak songs. These were all punishable “crimes”. With such restrictions, it was quite impossible for the ordinary person to get an education and to advance himself in any way. Such intolerable conditions led to a mass migration to the United States occurring mostly between the 1890’s and early 1900’s. Probably up to WWI.

My father had probably heard from friends and relatives that in the United States there was opportunity to find work and most important to him the opportunityfor his children to receive a good education and thus improve their lot inlife. He made the decision to come to the United States. This must have been a very difficult decisionfor my parents as they knew they might never see their own parents or sisters,or brothers again. My father was born inBeckov, County of Trencin in Austria-Hungaryon December 24, 1870. His father was John Pavlovic and his mother was Susanna Kvacala. His mother died when my father was very small and his father remarried. Beckov was a small village, the site of the ruins of a gothic fort. His father may have had a small plot of ground to use, the large fertile acreage was held by wealthy land owners and probably my grandfather made his living from this little garden.

Many of the young people left for the big city, Budapest, as there was probably more possibility to find work or a trade. My father went to Budapest as apprentice there to a tanner.

Mother was born in Brusnik, County of Novo Hradske,on September 19, 1873. Her parents were Paul Lipovsky and Maria Sloboda. Unfortunately, her father died when my mother was very small and I even heard at one point that he may have died before my mother was even born, due to an epidemic of some sort. Her mother was forced to find work to support my mother and brother and sister. She worked as a domestic and took the children, particularly the infant Susan with her, while she worked. So much for baby care in those days. Mother also went to the big city to find work and was employed there as a domestic worker. So my parents probably met in Budapest. She and father were married on July 4, 1897. Their marriage certificate, which I have, is completely in Hungarian and Marty and I have spent much time at Franklin Marshall College’s Library with Hungarian dictionaries trying to decipher or glean informationfrom the Certificate. Hungarian is not an easy language.

Dorothy McWilliams, Sue’s daughter, has mother’s weddingdress and her veil. The veil is nicely done up in the original shadow box the way my mother had it prepared. Dorothy risked washing the veil and it cameout beautifully.

When the difficult decision to leave homeland, parents, siblings was made by my parents, my father began to lay aside funds for his passage. The passage was called a shipcard then. He was ready to leave in 1906 and arrived in the United States on May 22, 1906. He went to north side Pittsburgh, which was then called Allegheny, and found employment with Westinghouse Electric. Later, Westinghouse moved to East Pittsburgh due to the need of expansion.

Mother meanwhile, left in Europe, moved to a little cottage on the outskirts of the village being completely on her own with three little girls to raise. There was one incident that is certainly very scary she use to tell us about it. One Christmas Eve, in the evening, she had just bathed the children and put them to bed and she took the basin of water and went out the door to empty it. When she came back, there was a strange man standing beside her fire. She was very frightened but tried not to show it. The man was holding a poker in his hand and he said to her “this is very nicely made.” She made no comment and then he said, “Where is your husband?” and she said, “Why it’s Christmas Eve, my husband is in church,” and really she wasn’t telling a lie, because I’m sure that father who was over in the United States also was in church for Christmas Eve. How scary that must have been for poor mother.

Mother arrived in East Pittsburgh on May 10, 1907, bringing with her Anna, age 6, Susan 4, and Mary 2. What a joyful reunion that must have been and mother was so touched by the fact that father brought to the train station a baby doll for each of his little ones. This still touches me. They settled in Chalfant Borough, where they lived until the last seven years of their lives. They were blessed with many children, but saddened by the deaths of three of them over the years. They had when my father came, Anna who wasborn in June 26, 1901, Susan in September 11, 1903 and Mary, January 25,1905. Sadly, Mary passed away on September 6, 1911 at the age of 6, having contracted diphtheria. Alice was the first born in the UnitedStates, January 31, 1908. Pauline was born March 12, 1910. Pauline, a lovely tender hearted little girl, whom I remember as being my second mother, because she loved to bathe me, dress me and take me for walks was apparently born as a bluebaby. She was never strong in herlifetime. She passed away on August 18,1924. It’s very sad that nowa days she could have been saved.

Then came John, the only son among so many sisters. He was born May 15, 1911, however he died very suddenly of a cerebral hemorrhage or aneurysm on May 7, 1935, just beforehis 24th birthday. My heart still aches for my parents, who although they loved all their daughters dearly, lost their only son. Then a little girl named Katie was born, but lived only a few days. This is in 1916.

John left a little son, Jack who is now 62 years old and Jack has a son Richard, so the Pavlovic name is carried on through Richard and his son Nicholas. Both Jack and Nicholas lives in Virginia. After John, came Margaret on June 2, 1913 and finally Emily on June 23, 1917. All except the three born in Austria-Hungary, were baptized at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Braddock and all of us were confirmed there. As you noticed, there was quite a difference in ages of the three oldest daughters and me. Ann was 16 years older, Sue 14 years older and Alice 9 years older. Therefore, I was not aware of many of their activities. I do know that Sue and Ann worked at Westinghouse and Alice after her high school graduation in 1925 went to Slippery Rock Teachers College desiring to go into the teaching profession. It was possible at that time to be hired as a teacher, even though all scholastic requirements were not met. One could continue on in evening school and in the summers. She was all set to teach in Chalfant Borough, but had one thing against her. She was too young, as 18 was minimum age for teachers and she would not have been 18 until January. I’m sure she was disappointed. She sought employment at Westinghouse where she met her husband to be, Ignatius (Naas) deVilliers.

When I speak of our family life therefore, it concerns mostly John, Marge and myself. We really had an interesting happy family life. I remember waiting for my father to come home from work and no matter that he was tired from his long day and from the long walk home, all up hill, he would sweep me up onto his shoulders. I was always his little girl, as I suppose the youngest in each family is. Even after I was almost middle aged when I was leaving to go shopping or whatever, he would caution me to be careful when I crossed the street My father was always loving and tender towards my mother, but he was definitely the head of our household. He it was who taught us our prayers, the Ten Commandments, the Apostles Creed. He also taught us many Slovak hymns and he had a ritual whereby on Saturday evening, after we smaller ones had been bathed and were ready for bed, we had a hymn sing. He had a pleasant strong voice and since the hymnal was words only, not the notes, he led us in the tune. Most of the time things went well, but on occasion, Marge and I would get the giggles over something. A mispronounced word, a word that had a funny meaning if used in English, or a squeak from my brother, whose voice was then changing. We got a frown that had quite a meaning and possibly a verbalreprimand. However, it was good for usto know all those hymns. Incidentally,we spoke only Slovak with our parents. My mother had a sweet voice and she also could sing and since I was at home for four years between the time Marge went to school and it was time forme to go to school, she would teach me many little Slovak folk songs. Now I’m going to sing one for you. It’s about a man who would like to have one of the geese swimming on the Danube River. The name of the town near which it took place in the song is Peshpadoc. It had been called Pressberg and nowit is called Guttieslava? The name of the river, the Duni, of course, is the Danube. John is the boy’s name or the young man’s name. Hooski are the geese and this is about as I said, the geese. Sings……..
I hope you got the drift of that little song. The friend wanted him to shoot the geese and he said no. He couldn’t shoot those geese. He knew those geese, they belonged to Susan, whom he was courting.

I remember it at this time that my brother having many chores as the only son, chopped wood and carried coal for the heater and watched the cow. Yes, we had a cow. In the summers John would take her to a nearby meadow and sit with her and his friend who had also been assigned to watch their cows. We had many kinds of animals some of which I remember. We had a pig, and before my time since this is from Marge, we had a goat and poor Mom had to milk this creature twice a day. Mother was also busy feeding the animals as we had chickens, ducks, geese, rabbits. What a menagerie. My job at the time, since I was preschool age, was to follow her around and pet the petables and stay away from the unfriendly ones. Our neighbors had bought a farm in New Jersey and on one visit, when my father wanted to sell the cow, they bought her and she had a long train ride to New Jersey to live with the Futers.

Our typical Sunday went something like this. First we had a long walk to the street car togo to church in Braddock. Every service lasted two hours. Then Sunday dinner, then much company as we all had friends and of course my parents had friends and when the friends came to visit they brought all their children. The older girls had boyfriends, my brother had several young men friends who later all played instruments and so had formed a little musical group. One of his friends, a guitar player, Zygmunt Malinowski would later marry Margaret. On an occasional Sunday, my father would take us to the Pittsburgh Zoo, the Carnegie Museum or Phipps Conservatory and also would take us various places. He took us to Carnegie Music Hall for the organ recital. One of the thrilling moments was to watch the floor manual pipe organ being lifted out of the orchestra pit. I think the beautiful music I heard then was when I first took such a liking to the organ. I’ll tell you a little bit about the holiday sand how we celebrated them. July 4 seemed to be a traditional day for a church picnic. I remember the picnic being held in Frick Park, especially because Rev. Molnar always decided there should be a race called the Pavlovic race. This was very humorous because my mother being just 4’-10" and probably that much around at the time, had to run and try to beat my father. Now he was 6 feet tall with long legs so they gave mother a slight advantage. They put her about 20 feet in front of my father to start the race and they would both run. First my father would get there first, sit down and pretend he had been there for hours. It was all very funny.

December 13th was St. Lucia Day. If we had our shoes polished and by the door of the bedroom, we may receive something in the shoes. Usually some walnuts and an orange. Christmas Eve--father’s birthday. First we had our typical menu for Christmas Eve supper. Mushroom or sauerkraut soup, fish, bobulke which we didn’t call them that , but that’s what most Slovak people call them. They were bread sticks which my mother had baked and she would cut them up into 1” pieces, pour boiling water over them and drain them quickly and then she would mix them either with ground nuts or with poppy seeds and honey. They were suppose to be very good, but I never cared for poppy seed myself. Then we would go to church, because we traditionally, of course, had a service on Christmas Eve. After we came home oh, during the service there was also the children’s so called program and Pastor Molnar use to give every little child a speech to say and he would make it up. They were all original. They of course weren’t very long. For instance, mine was…………………(inSlovak). That was the extent of it. On our return home, father would light the real candles on the tree and gifts would be given. I still have one of my gifts, which I treasure so much. It’s a coloring book. One and only coloring book in my whole history. Wonder what kids would do nowadays if they didn’t have hundreds and hundreds of coloring books.

After the meal, I forgot to mention this in its proper sequence, father would distribute ..oblatky… These were wafers made out of the same batter that communion wafers were made but they were quite large. He would put a little honey on the wafer and he would pass the first one to my mother because this all went by ages and I would be waiting with much anticipation. Finally it came around to me and I got my oplatky. Actually we had them this past Christmas toohere at Barbara and Dan’s home.

There came a time of course after these many happy years that our family started to scatter due to the marriage of the various people. Sue was married to Walter Bauder on October 10, 1925. Alice to Ignatiusde Villiers, August 8, 1929. John to Emma Tomko, November 22, 1932, Ann to Herbert Manning December 9, 1933, Marge to Zygmunt Malinowski April 28, 1934, and Emily to Martin McIntire October 4, 1940.

I must admit that part of the reason I don’t know more about my ancestors is that as a small child I didn’t pay close attention when family matters were discussed. The other reason is that my parents probably had discussed our family with the older ones and did not want to repeat it endlessly. I do know there were a few relatives who had come to America and whom I knew about. One was the Rev. Kvacala, my father’s cousin. He served several Lutheran parishes in western Pennsylvania including Braddock for several years and finally served in Johnstown where he died in 1920. He is buried there in the cemetery where hundreds of unidentified victims of the Great Johnstown Flood are also buried. He had children, Carl Pavlovic, my father’s stepbrother came in the early 1920’s to earn a nest egg. He returned to Beckov and we lost track ofthat family.

The Kabonis family. Distant relatives, but I’m unclear just how. Bessie Kabonis lives in Arizona. She is in her 80’s. Messha family—they are cousins of myfathers. Mardia was the mother in the family there. I still correspond with her daughter Josephine who is in her 80’s and lives in Berwyn, IL.

In 1928, as most of us here know, dark days came. Father always wanted the best for his girls so he built a large beautiful house. It had four bedrooms, it had a beautiful large living room, three porches and it was just a very, very nice house. Then, unfortunately, the Depression came. One by one all who had been working lost their jobs and at that time, mother became ill with appendicitis. She had to stay in the hospital around three weeks and for awhile she had to have privaten urses because she was very ill. I was in 8th grade and high school at the time and no help at all to the family of course. After trying in everyway to raise the monthly mortgage payments, father finally had to give up. I can see him at the dining room table figuring, figuring, but with no income the figures never added up to enough. In 1934 we lost our home and we had to move. Luckily, father had kept the little house and we moved back to the little house. There was just mother, father, myself, Marge, Ziggie and little Barbara had been born. Marge, Ziggie and little Barbara moved to a little apartment. Ann sought work in Philadelphia, John and Emma had been married and they also took a little apartment on Shaven Street. Not till January 1936, did I finally get a secretarial job up at Westinghouse. Shortly after, father started to slip healthwise and had to go on disability. Then John died, such sad, sad years.

In spite of the sad times of mourning for love ones that had passed on, sickness, ill fortune, the trauma of the depression years, we were on the whole a happy family all due to my wonderful parents. I’m glad I was that little girl who belonged to my parents no matter where they were.

I just want to add a little information about our parents. In 1951, mother suffered a stroke. The doctor said she could no longer live alone, that is with my father and herself and no one else closeby. So they came to live with us. It was very nice for our children, and especially for Dan who was only 8 months old when grandma came to live with us and as he progressed through his childhood years, she was able to spend time with him, playing Old Maid, reading the comics to him, playing games and soforth. So the children did benefit from having their grandparents there. They both lived long lives into their 80’s. Father passed away on June 27, 1953. Mother December 19, 1957 and they are both buried at Restland Cemetery,Monroeville, Pennsylvania.


NOTE: This is a transcription of a tape of the Pavlovic History as told by Emily McIntire, probably done some time in 1992-93. I had difficulties with spelling as some of the words were in Slovak. 
Lipovszky, Suzanna (I1701)
 
4 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S812408060)
 
5 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no war ranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew , Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S812408060)
 
6 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S812408060)
 
7 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S812409638)
 
8 <i>Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests</i>. The National Archives at Washington, D.C<p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="##SearchUrlPrefix##/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=8769" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Source (S812409630)
 
9 26 Years old soldier, home on leave from the Russian Army. Karolina is a 20 year old maiden living with her parents in Sanniki Family (F388)
 
10 26th of November 1815, I, priest [of Kazimierz parish], blessed the following couple: the groom is Michał Trzecki, bachelor, 28 years old, and the bride is Katarzyna Kiełbucka, virgin from Kazimierz town, 20 years old. Family (F431)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Grabowski, Robert (I555)
 
12 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gleason, Christine (I554)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Morton, Jennifer (I42)
 
14 Apolonia Jankowska is the 2 x great grandmother of the wife of Franciszek Malinowski (Stanislawa Wachowska) Family (F434)
 
15 Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London.
<p>Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation. The City of London gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R 0HB. Email - ask.lma@cityoflondon.gov.uk. Infringement of the above condition may result in legal action.</p> 
Source (S812409634)
 
16 Cathedral Cemetery Jones, Susanne D. (I1466)
 
17 Cathedral Cemetery, Scranton Jones, Susanne D. (I1466)
 
18 Cause of Death: Weakness Paulovicz, Stephani (I1050)
 
19 Communicant Member of Ardmore Lutheran Church, Forest Hills, Wilkensburg, Pa. Oliver E. Graebower, Pastor Pavlovic, Margaret (I3)
 
20 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family (F144)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Malinowski, John Dennis (I1)
 
22 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family (F575)
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family (F247)
 
24 During 1930 Frank and his brother Thomas were boarders in a home at 209 North Ave. Frank worked as a machinist at the Westinghouse Electric Company in East Pittsburgh Malinowski, Franciszek (I4)
 
25 Eugene Paul Malinowski (son of Zygmunt Malinowski and Margaret
Pavlovic) was born on 01 Sep 1937 in Pittsburgh, Allegheny,
Pennsylvania, USA. He died on 10 Apr 2021 in Greensburg,
Westmoreland, Pennsylvania, USA. He married Shelia M. Krezan.
She was born on 06 Mar 1947 in Greensburg, Westmoreland,
Pennsylvania, USA. She died on 27 Dec 1995. He married Marjorie
Elsie Moore (daughter of William Vinton Moore and Marjorie A
Raynor) on 30 Sep 1959 in Southold, Suffolk, New York, USA. She
was born on 06 Jul 1943 in Greenport, Suffolk, New York, USA. She
died on 18 Dec 2006 in New Jersey. 
Malinowski, Eugene Paul (I2477)
 
26 Family history indicates Stanislawa divorced Francizck Malinowski and Married Franciszek's brother Tomasz Family (F266)
 
27 Family history indicates Stanislawa divorced Francizck Malinowski and Married Franciszek's brother Tomasz. I have no information whether Francizek ever remarried. Family (F267)
 
28 Find A Grave Source (S812408091)
 
29 For the upcoming 1910 census, Slovak and other ethnic leaders in the United States sucessfully petitioned federal authorities to classify a person by his or her language rather than country of origin. On the president's orders, new forms replaced the old o Pavlovic, Stefan (I1700)
 
30 Franciszek Malinowski born in Jozefow in Blonie county
· 1815-1918 Russia(Kingdom of Poland), Błonie County Masovian (Mazowieckie in Polish) Voivodeship(Province)
· 1918-1939 Poland,Warsaw Province, Błonie County with the seat in Grodzisk 
Malinowski, Franciszek (I4)
 
31 General Register Office. <i>England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes</i>. London, England: General Register Office. © Crown copyright. Published by permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Office for National Statistics. You must not copy on, transfer or reproduce records without the prior permission of ONS. Database Copyright © 1998-2003 Graham Hart, Ben Laurie, Camilla von Massenbach and David Mayall. Source (S812409631)
 
32 God Parents: Pavel Hrien and Zuzanna Balaz Lipovszky, Suzanna (I1701)
 
33 Godparents are: Ignacy Galaj and Jozefa Stanislawska Malinowski, Franciszek (I4)
 
34 Godparents are: Ignacy Wachowski and Konstancja Fijalkowska Malinowski, Edmund Maryan (I28)
 
35 I have announced banns and when I have found no obstacle against this marriage I have blessed the following couple: Michał Maciejewski, bachelor, and Agnieszka Grocholska, maid. Witnesses are: Antoni Wojtowicz and Jan Spisz, townsmen from Skulsk. Family (F400)
 
36 Ignacy is 27 years old, born in Kamieniec Village in Wloclawek county. Balbina is 27 years old, born in Kazimierz town in Slupca county. Family (F389)
 
37 John James Devlin was a carpenter. He brought his tools from England and passed them on to his son Joe. He was a short man, considered mean and left Ireland for England in search of work. He was born in county Tyrone, Northern Ireland near the river Tyne.; the year is given as 1865 in the Genealogy files and on his headstone.
Information on his death certificate was given by his son James Devlin, about 32 years old at the time.
 
Devlin, John James (I2367)
 
38 Kacper died at midday, he was 34 years old and survived by his wife - Helena nee Jacczak and his son Josef. Malinowski, Kacper (I1261)
 
39 MALINOWSKI
MARIE J.
Age 87, of South Park, on June 19, 2006. Wife of the late Walter B. Malinowski; loving mother of Paula S. Whisner, Linda K., Richard W, Mark S., and Raymond T. Malinowski; grandmother of Jill Davenport, Becky Gordon, Laurel, Kate, Dennis, Mindy, an d Maika Malinowski; great-grandmother of Austin and Makayla Davenport; sister of Harriet, Irene and Wanda. Visitation will be from 2-4 and 7-9pm Thursday and Friday at the JEFFERSON MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME, INC., 301 Curry Hollow Rd., Pleasant Hills . A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated 1:00pm Saturday at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, South Park. Inurnment at Jefferson Memorial Park. 
Kaczmarck, Marie Josephine (I70)
 
40 MALINOWSKI
MARIE J.
Age 87, of South Park, on June 19, 2006. Wife of the late Walter B. Malinowski; loving mother of Paula S. Whisner, Linda K., Richard W, Mark S., and Raymond T. Malinowski; grandmother of Jill Davenport, Becky Gordon, Laurel, Kate, Dennis, Mindy, and Maika Malinowski; great-grandmother of Austin and Makayla Davenport; sister of Harriet, Irene and Wanda. Visitation will be from 2-4 and 7-9pm Thursday and Friday at the JEFFERSON MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME, INC., 301 Curry Hollow Rd., Pleasant Hills. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated 1:00pm Saturday at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, South Park. Inurnment at Jefferson Memorial Park. 
Kaczmarck, Marie Josephine (I70)
 
41 Margaret May "Maggie" Joyce was born in May 1844 in Ireland to Elizabeth Maloney, age 24, and Robert Joyce, age 34. Death certificate for Margaret Joyce Dillon shows her parents as Robert Joyce and Margaret Maloney; husband is Thomas. Joyce, Margaret May "Maggie" (I2460)
 
42 Margaret May "Maggie" Joyce was born in May 1844 in Ireland to Elizabeth Maloney, age 24, and Robert Joyce, age 34. Death certificate for Margaret Joyce Dillon shows her parents as Robert Joyce and Margaret Maloney; husband is Thomas. Joy, Maurice (I2382)
 
43 Marital Status: M Mesha, Samuel (I571)
 
44 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head of House: Wife Pavlovic, Susanna (I19)
 
45 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head: Brother Kempton, George E. (I2154)
 
46 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head: Head Kempton, George E. (I2154)
 
47 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head: Head Pavlovic, Stefan (I1700)
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Watson, Joseph (I465)
 
49 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head: Roomer Malinowski, Tomasz (I1679)
 
50 Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head: Roomer Malinowski, Franciszek (I4)
 

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